TABLE of CONTENTS October 2005

Cover Story

The Last One-Term Statehouse

BY Rob Gurwitt

If Virginia governors could serve two terms, they'd get a lot more done. But would the state be better off?

Features

Rethinking The Urban Speedway

For decades, highway engineers focused on designing wider, straighter, faster roads. Now, moving traffic quickly is no longer the sole goal. BY Christopher Swope

Monster Maps

Has devious district-making killed electoral competition? BY Alan Greenblatt

Fraud Squad

Appointing inspectors general to probe reports of wrongdoing is politically popular. And some IGs are becoming very powerful. BY Jonathan Walters

Where Are They Now?

States and localities are using GPS to put moving targets on the map. BY Ellen Perlman

Tailpipe Revolt

Nobody likes to do emissions testing. A few states have decided it's time to stop. EPA is willing to listen. BY Elizabeth Daigneau

Bitter Pill Fight

Two drug-pricing initiatives are duking it out in California. BY Alan Greenblatt

Up Front

Housing

A New View of Sprawl

The conventional wisdom about suburbs and sprawl can change dramatically over time. BY Alan Ehrenhalt
Potomac Chronicle

Fight Against Fat

State and local governments are discovering new weapons in the battle to keep citizens in shape. BY Donald F. Kettl
Energy & Environment

Risk and Responsibility

If the feds always pay the tab for disaster relief, there's little local incentive to halt risky development. BY Christopher Swope
Infrastructure & Environment

Hybrid Confusion

Some hybrid cars can save government a lot of money. Others don't save it a dime. BY Christopher Swope
Politics

Duop Music

Broadband politics is turning out to be mostly just a game for two. That's not always good. BY Christopher Swope
Public Safety & Justice

Puff Of Collusion

Cigarette companies and state regulators have discovered it pays to stick together. BY Christopher Swope
Infrastructure & Environment

Like Putting Mascara On A Battleship

Big-box stores with fancy decoration are still just big boxes. BY Christopher Swope
Politics

Santa in Uniontown

Joe Hardy ran for county office to revive his community--even if he had to pay for it himself. BY Anya Sostek
Politics

Santa in Uniontown

Joe Hardy ran for county office to revive his community--even if he had to pay for it himself. BY Anya Sostek

The Business of Government

Politics

Government To Go

A handful of public officials and agencies are making their messages and meetings available by "podcast." BY Ellen Perlman
Politics

Government To Go

A handful of public officials and agencies are making their messages and meetings available by "podcast." BY Ellen Perlman
Infrastructure & Environment

Zen & the Art of Bicycling

How can public policies make cycling safer and encourage people to ride more often? Hint: It doesn't involve helmets. BY Alex Marshall
Finance

Rebirth Of The 'Death Tax'

States Are Turning Back To Estate Taxes BY Josh Goodman
Tech Talk

A Sticky Business

No state is immune from hosting private contractors who come to do a job, are paid well--and never leave. BY Ellen Perlman
Tech Talk

A Sticky Business

No state is immune from hosting private contractors who come to do a job, are paid well--and never leave. BY Ellen Perlman
Tech Talk

A Sticky Business

No state is immune from hosting private contractors who come to do a job, are paid well--and never leave. BY Ellen Perlman
Energy & Environment

The Used-Food Market

With oil prices jumping, local governments may want to take another look at turning into energy material their garbage trucks pick up every day. BY Tom Arrandale
Economic Engines

When Brac Comes Calling

Nothing is more political or emotional than base closures. But in the end, how much does it really matter? BY William Fulton