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Two Years of High School, then College?

Traditionally, U.S. high school students complete four years of coursework before they receive their degree and enroll in college courses. But according to the...
by | February 22, 2010
 

Traditionally, U.S. high school students complete four years of coursework before they receive their degree and enroll in college courses. But according to the National Center on Education and the Economy, almost half of the students who attend community college have to enroll in remedial courses because they are unprepared. In order to help students become college-ready, NCEE recently announced that for the 2011-2012 school year, eight states will implement a board examination system, allowing high school students the option to receive his or her diploma and enter an open-enrollment college after 10th grade if they pass examinations demonstrating that they can handle college work. Alternately, a student that passes the boards can continue with another two years of high school instruction in order to apply to a selective college. Those who don't pass exams the first time can work on any weaknesses the following year and take the board exams later. States will have an option of approving as many as five systems that schools can use for evaluating students, including the Advanced Placement and International Baccalaureate programs. This pilot is funded through a grant from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation. (Thumbnail: Casey Serin/flickr)

Tina Trenkner
Tina Trenkner  |  Deputy Editor, GOVERNING.com
ttrenkner@governing.com  |  @tinatrenkner

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