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Nigel Jacob, Urban Technologist-in-Residence at Living Cities and convener of its City Accelerator initiative, speaks at Lipscomb University's Collaboration 101 conference about leading examples of urban innovation that relied on collaboration and the emerging practice of collective impact to improve the lives of low-income residents.
Jacob is scheduled to speak at 1:50 Eastern/ 12:50 Central/ 10:50 Pacific on Tuesday, October 21.

At 1:50 p.m., former POY and leader of the City Accelerator initiative Nigel Jacob will discuss urban innovations to help the poor.

 

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Cuts to Child Welfare Force States to Spend Smarter

At a glance, it appears we have something of an epidemic. Reports out of Florida, South Carolina and Texas, among others, suggest that several state children and family services systems are struggling. This naturally leads to the question of whether, in light of all these reports, we're headed for further (or chronic) crisis in the child welfare world?

Whenever bad stories start flowing from states, there are a few additional key questions that invariably come up: The first is, are we spending enough money on child welfare? The second is, are we spending money in as effective a fashion as possible? The former is a particularly relevant question right now in the wake of two recent reports. READ MORE

How We Can Get Our Mobility Back

Americans embraced the automobile in the 20th century as a way to freely travel when and where they wanted -- it offered us unparalleled mobility. Traffic congestion from that love affair, however, has made mobility one of the biggest challenges faced by our metropolitan areas in the 21st century.

Americans aren't alone. Global gridlock is what Bill Ford, chairman of the Ford Motor Co., predicts if there aren't significant changes to our transportation strategies. "Any business only exists to make peoples' lives better," he told an audience of government leaders and technology specialists recently. "At a certain point, shoving more vehicles into urban environments doesn't do that." READ MORE

A New Direction in the War on Poverty

There are some politicians who would have you think that half the United States is on welfare, lounging in that now famous "hammock" versus struggling to free themselves from the "safety net." This view prevails even in the wake of the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Act of 1996, also known as welfare reform, which very pointedly -- and arguably effectively -- put time limits on benefits.

Now along comes Republican House Budget Committee Chairman Paul Ryan of Wisconsin with a bold proposal to consolidate and block grant 24 antipoverty programs, including Temporary Assistance for Needy Families, housing assistance and child care subsidies. Under the Ryan plan, states would be free to spend the money any way they saw fit as long as it wasn't on unrelated programs such as roads and parks. As my colleague, Governing columnist Don Kettl, will argue in the October issue of the magazine, it's an idea worth considering. READ MORE

When Bob McDonnell Was Good

When now-convicted, former governor Bob McDonnell was running for the state legislature 23 years ago in Virginia Beach, he was always straight with me, a reporter covering his campaign. I came to like and admire the cartoonishly clean-cut man with the picture-perfect wife and children.

So it was with sadness and some disbelief that I watched a jury last week convict him and his wife Maureen of corruption. I have a hard time believing the man I knew would trade his office for dollars. I can imagine that man, being a man, bending or breaking rules to placate an angry and confused spouse. Which it certainly seemed like she was, based on the evidence presented in trial. READ MORE

Leadership in a Time of Drought

As government leaders in California wend their way through the management of the state's historic drought, real discussions about how the state should adapt to water scarcity are taking place. And if history is a guide, the decisions made in the Golden State will have their impact in other places where water scarcity is becoming the norm.

Make no mistake: California is moving forward into uncharted territory. Traditional engineered solutions, such as the California Aqueduct that channels water from the wetter regions in the north to the arid south, are being challenged by a host of factors beyond the drought, including environmental regulations and the capacity of the systems themselves. Such water-transfer projects made it possible for the drier Southland to grow and become the most populous region of the state. But government and private-sector leaders are rapidly realizing that other approaches will be needed to fulfill future statewide agriculture, business and residential water needs. READ MORE