Tuition Rollbacks

My son is currently in the midst of applying to colleges, so I am on heightened alert when it comes to news headlines with the ...
by | November 7, 2006
 

Caps My son is currently in the midst of applying to colleges, so I am on heightened alert when it comes to news headlines with the word "tuition." In the past couple of days, I have read several interesting articles about lowering state university rates in Maryland and Pennsylvania.

In anticipation of an influx of new workers because of military base closings elsewhere, the Washington Post reports that Maryland's Board of Regents has decided to waive the 12-month waiting period to qualify for in-state tuition for civil service employees of the armed forces and their families who transfer there. While 46 states have a similar policy for dependents of uniformed military personnel, including civilians is unique. In addition, the Board is considering whether to extend the waiver to contract workers. 

A much more far-reaching -- and far-fetched -- change was proposed by a legislator last week in neighboring Pennsylvania. Outgoing state Senator Joe Conti posted a video on his Web site calling for expanding the sales tax to a dozen products and services (such as bottled water, cable TV, dry cleaning and private detectives ) and creating a dedicated funding stream that could be used to reduce Pennsylvania State University's tuition by 60 percent. At $12,000 per year, Penn State has the country's most expensive in-state public university tuition.   

Note: This may be the last time I can write about Maryland or PSU without having a vested interest. Both schools are on my son's short list, and applications are due by the end of this month. 

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