Putting Wedlock Asunder?

On November 8, citizens in Texas who vote for a constitutional amendment to ban same-sex marriage could inadvertently be voting to ban the institution altogether. Some ...
by | October 26, 2005

Bridegroom_1 On November 8, citizens in Texas who vote for a constitutional amendment to ban same-sex marriage could inadvertently be voting to ban the institution altogether.

Some opponents of the amendment say it's worded in such a way that it would nullify all marriages in the state, according to the Austin American-Statesman :

The first sentence of an intended ban on same-sex marriage, drafted by state lawmakers last spring, defines marriage as between a man and a woman.

The second sentence states: "This state or a political subdivision of this state may not create or recognize any legal status identical or similar to marriage."

And not recognizing anything "identical" to marriage could mean not recognizing marriage, said Glen Maxey, who heads No Nonsense in November, an Austin-based group battling the amendment.

Eliminating matrimony is certainly one way to end the debate over gay marriage. But it's probably not what the writers of this amendment had in mind.

Zach Patton | Executive Editor | zpatton@governing.com