Citizen Surveys

Frequently, those of us who work on the Citizens and Performance section of Governing.com receive emails from project directors around the country telling us ...
January 18, 2008

Citizensandperformance Frequently, those of us who work on the Citizens and Performance section of Governing.com receive emails from project directors around the country telling us about projects relevant to the topic of citizen involvement in performance management.

Peg Stevenson, the Director of City Services Auditor, and Betsy Baum, the Associate Performance Auditor in San Francisco, contacted us to share some additional information on the San Francisco Citizen Survey, highlighted in the sidebar to Jonathan Walters' article (April 2007) "Polling the Populace."

"San Francisco has been doing citizen surveys since 1996 -- this past year we reached nearly 3,700 residents by mail, phone and Web to give San Francisco a Report Card on its services. Like some other cities, some departments use these for performance measurement and others to advise policy decisions," said Baum in an email.

The San Francisco survey measures city services that people use in their daily activities, including streets, parks, libraries and the MUNI public transportation system. Also included are demographics and basic characteristics of all city residents.

Significant findings from the most recenty survey include:

    • In 2007, 40 percent of city residents rated city government favorably, higher than any other survey year.
    • In 1999, the city survey reported that 60 percent of residents had a personal computer at home, but less than 50 percent had Internet access. By 2007, 82 percent had a home computer, and 80 percent had Internet access.
    • While residents use city information services for many reasons, 40 percent do so to prepare themselves for a disaster.

For the 2007 report, click here. For past reports, click here. For more information, you can contact Peg Stevenson directly.

Previously: Data Dashboards

Know of a program that we oughta know about? Email Heather Kleba and tell her about it!

Join the Discussion

After you comment, click Post. You can enter an anonymous Display Name or connect to a social profile.

More from View