Once You Become a Joke...

Some of the bloggers are starting to have fun mocking the Clinton campaign's arguments for why things aren't really as grim as they look. Here's ...
by | February 21, 2008
 

Some of the bloggers are starting to have fun mocking the Clinton campaign's arguments for why things aren't really as grim as they look.

Here's a comment posted on TNR's The Plank:

Yeah, but this just goes to show that Obama only wins in states that hold contested elections. Sure, he wins big in caucus states, he wins big in primary states, he wins big when turnout is low, and he wins big with record-high turnout. But what the Obama-worshipping media is overlooking is that in each of the 25 state contests Obama has won so far, his name appeared on the ballot. It's time to stop giving Obama a pass on this critical issue.

Remember, if Hillary Clinton wins the Democratic nomination, Barack Obama's name will not be on the ballot in November. And only Hillary Clinton has demonstrated that she can win when Obama's name is not on the ballot. In fact, she's undefeated in contests where Obama is not on the ballot, making her clearly the more electable general-election candidate.

Here's TPI's fake memo from Mark Penn, Clinton's lead strategist:

To: Interested Parties

From: Mark Penn

Re: Obama's 75% Ceiling

While we heartily congratulate Senator Obama's campaign on their Wisconsin victory, the final results must be less than heartening to the Obama campaign.

1) Obama has a ceiling of 75% of Democratic primary support. Barack Obama has consistently won primaries and caucuses with only 75% or less of the vote. In addition to effectively disenfranchising the at least 25% of the Democratic electorate that is not voting for him, the Obama camp cannot be happy that their candidate hasn't reached 90% of the vote in any contest since the U.S. Virgin Islands on February 9.

Hat tip: Andrew Sullivan's stand-ins

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