On NYC Ballots, a Candidate Goes Missing

From the people who brought you the Committee on Coversheet Review, the New York City Board of Elections has a twist on the meaning of &...
by | August 19, 2009

From the people who brought you the Committee on Coversheet Review, the New York City Board of Elections has a twist on the meaning of "absentee ballot." In this case, it's one of the candidates who is absent.

Liz Benjamin explains:

The absentee ballots for the upcoming Democratic primary contests are starting to arrive in mailboxes throughout the city, and 1st CD voters might notice a glaring omission.

Despite the fact that a state Supreme Court justice restored his name to the ballot last week, incumbent Councilman Alan Gerson's name is nowhere to be seen.

The city Board of Elections says its longstanding policy is to print all absentee ballots immediately following the completion of hearings on challenges to candidates' designating petitions to ensure compliance with the legal requirement that the ballots be sent out 32 days prior to an election.

In other words, this isn't the first time a candidate was restored to the ballot after the absentees were printed.

(Hat tip: Ballot Access News)

It's understandable that New York City would need to print ballots in time to get them to voters. But, shouldn't the Board of Elections be making decisions about candidate eligibility early enough to allow for legal challenges, especially given that the Board makes a habit of throwing candidates off the ballot for technicalities?

--Josh Goodman

Josh Goodman
Josh Goodman  |  Former Staff Writer
mailbox@governing.com  | 

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