NY Senate Deal Back on Life Support

A week ago, it appeared that New York State's Senate Democrats had finally made a deal with their renegade caucus members, allowing them to ...
by | December 10, 2008
 

A week ago, it appeared that New York State's Senate Democrats had finally made a deal with their renegade caucus members, allowing them to take control of the chamber -- as it appeared they did on election day.

Well, according to Malcolm Smith, the Democratic leader, the deal's off:

Sen. Malcolm Smith said today that he will cease negotiations on the reorganization of the Senate with the so-called "Gang of Three".

"We are suspending negotiations, effective immediately, because to do so otherwise would reduce our moral standing and the long-term Senate Democratic commitment to reform and change," Smith said. "It became very clear to me, over time, that those negotiations started being more about self interest."

...

"Frankly, we would rather wait two more years to take charge of the Senate than to simply serve the interests of a few," Smith said.

He also said limiting civil rights of New Yorkers should not be part of the negotiations, but should be part of the legislative process. It was reported that Diaz would not support a Senate leader who would push a bill legalizing same-sex marriage.

New York Republicans, in response, enjoy a good laugh (and rightfully so).

Meanwhile, Senate Majority Leader Dean Skelos, R-Rockville Centre, released a statement saying the Senate Republican conference "stands united and focused on governing."

"I appreciate the strong support of every member of the Republican conference and we will continue to work together with all the members of the Senate on ways to reform and improve the operation of our house," he said in the statement. "We will also continue to work in a bipartisan fashion with the governor and the Assembly to address the significant fiscal challenges we face."

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