Corzine Still Losing

Two polls out today show continuing trouble for Jon Corzine, the Democratic governor of New Jersey, who is trailing his Republican challenger. According to Quinnippiac, ...
by | September 1, 2009

Jcorzine Two polls out today show continuing trouble for Jon Corzine, the Democratic governor of New Jersey, who is trailing his Republican challenger.

According to Quinnippiac, former U.S. Attorney Chris Christie is leading, 47 to 37 percent, among likely voters, with 9 percent going for independent Christopher Daggett.

This belies the hope among Democrats that a recent spate of bad publicity would dampen Christie's chances. Instead, Christie has an even bigger lead than he held in the same poll last month.

A Fairleigh Dickinson University poll is slightly less grim for Corzine. According to that survey, Christie's lead is just five points, 47 to 42 percent, with Corzine gaining a bit of ground. That poll doesn't name Daggett.

A Democracy Poll out last week showed the race at 43 to 41, Christie's advantage, with Daggett taking 7 percent. As the name suggests, that poll comes from a Democratc firm.

A showing of 37 to 42 percent is bad enough news for any incumbent two months prior to Election Day. Some of Quinnipiac's other numbers may be even worse. Sixty percent of those polled disapprove of Corzine's job performance and 57 percent of likely voters have an unfavorable opinion of him. By comparison, 51 percent of those polled give a favorable rating to President Obama.

But the tell-tale number might be that 69 percent say they are somewhat or very dissatisfied "with the way things are going in New Jersey."

It's going to be tough for Corzine, obviously. Christie has apparently survived a season of scandal and the Quinnipiac Poll indicates that voters are evenly split on the question of whether the negative ads being run by both sides are fair, indicating that it's going to be tough for the incumbent to break through with any new message.

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