A Debate on State Health Care Regulation!

I thought the most interesting exchange from last night's presidential debate was the discussion of state health regulation. That either means that I'm too fixated ...
by | October 8, 2008

I thought the most interesting exchange from last night's presidential debate was the discussion of state health regulation. That either means that I'm too fixated on state policy or it means that the debate was really boring (or, most likely, both).

Barack Obama kicked it off by criticizing John McCain (transcript via CNN):

So what one hand giveth, the other hand taketh away. He would also strip away the ability of states to provide some of the regulations on insurance companies to make sure you're not excluded for pre-existing conditions or your mammograms are covered or your maternity is covered. And that is fundamentally the wrong way to go.

McCain's response:

I want to give every American a $5,000 refundable tax credit. They can take it anywhere, across state lines. Why not? Don't we go across state lines when we purchase other things in America? Of course it's OK to go across state lines because in Arizona they may offer a better plan that suits you best than it does here in Tennessee.

Then Obama replied:

And the reason that it's a problem to go shopping state by state, you know what insurance companies will do? They will find a state -- maybe Arizona, maybe another state -- where there are no requirements for you to get cancer screenings, where there are no requirements for you to have to get pre-existing conditions, and they will all set up shop there.

That's how in banking it works. Everybody goes to Delaware, because they've got very -- pretty loose laws when it comes to things like credit cards.

And in that situation, what happens is, is that the protections you have, the consumer protections that you need, you're not going to have available to you.

Josh Goodman
Josh Goodman  |  Former Staff Writer
mailbox@governing.com  | 

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